National Association of Adult Survivors of Child Abuse

National Association of Adult Survivors of Child Abuse

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EDITOR'S NOTE: Occasionally we bring you articles from local newspapers, web sites and other sources that constitute but a small percentage of the information available to those who are interested in the issues of child abuse and recovery from it.

We also present original articles we hope will inform the community ...
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  Child Maltreatment

Facts at a glance - 2013

by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control
Division of Violence Prevention

Child Maltreat
ment

• In 2011, U.S. state and local child protective services (CPS) received an estimated 3.7 million referrals of children being abused or neglected. 1

• CPS estimated that 681,000 children (9.1 per 1,000) were victims of maltreatment.

• Of the child victims, 79% were victims of neglect; 18% of physical abuse; 9% of sexual abuse; and 10% were victims of other types of maltreatment including threatened abuse, parent’s drug/alcohol abuse, or lack of supervision.

• CPS reports of child maltreatment may underestimate the true occurrence. Non-CPS studies estimate that 1 in 7 U.S. children experience some form of child maltreatment in their lifetimes.
2-4

• Between 1990 and 2010, CPS-reported rates of sexual violence declined 62%, physical abuse declined 56%, and neglect declined 10%.
5

• The total lifetime economic burden resulting from new cases of fatal and nonfatal child maltreatment in the United States is approximately $124 billion.
6

Deaths from Maltreatment

• In 2011, an estimated 1,750 children died from child maltreatment (rate of 2.1 per 100,000 children). 1

• Of the children who died from maltreatment in 2011, 71% experienced neglect either exclusively or in combination with another form of maltreatment and 48% percent experienced physical abuse either exclusively or in combination with another form of maltreatment. 1

• Of child maltreatment fatalities in 2011, 81.6% occurred among children younger than age 4; 9.5% among 4-7 year-olds; 4.6% among 8-11 year-olds; 2.2% among 12-15 year-olds; and 1.4% among 16-17 year-olds. 1

• The fatality rate for boys was 2.5 per 100,000 and for girls was 1.7 per 100,000. 1

• The 2011 rates of death per 100,000 children was 3.9 for African Americans, 2.6 for American Indian/Alaska Natives, 1.9 for Hispanics, 1.6 for non-Hispanic Whites, 1.2 for Pacific Islanders and 0.4 for Asians. 1

Characteristics of Victims

• In 2011, 35% of victims were younger than 3 years, with children younger than 1 year having the highest rate of victimization (21.2 per 1,000 children). 1

• The rates of victimization in 2011 were 8.7 per 1,000 children for boys and 9.6 per 1,000 children for girls. 1

• The 2011 rates of victimization per 1,000 children were 14.3 for African Americans, 11.4 for American Indian/Alaska Natives, 8.5 for Pacific Islanders, 8.6 for Hispanics, 7.9 for non-Hispanic Whites, and 1.7 for Asians. 1

• Approximately three quarters of victims in 2011 had no prior victimization for each year from 2007-2011. 1

Characteristics of Perpatators

• Most victims in 2011 were maltreated by a parent (80.8%). Other perpetrators included relatives other than parents (5.9%), unmarried partners of parents (4.4%), and other unrelated adults (2.9%). 1

• In 2011, fewer than 6% of perpetrators were aged < 19 years; 36.4% were aged 20–29 years; 32.3% were aged 30–39 years; 15.9% were aged 40–49 years; and 5.0% were aged 50-59 years. 1

• Two-fifths (45.1%) of perpetrators in 2011 were men, and 53.6% were women. 1

References:

1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Children’s Bureau. (2012). Child Maltreatment 2011. Available from http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/research-data-technology/statistics-research/child-maltreatment

2. Finkelhor D, Turner H, Ormond R, Hamby SL. Violence, abuse, and crime exposure in a national sample of children and youth. Pediatrics 2009; 124:1411-1423.

3. Theodore AD, Chang JJ, Runyan DK, Hunter WM, Bangdewala SI, Agans R. Epidemiologic features of the physical and sexual maltreatment of children in the Carolinas. Pediatrics 2005; 115: e331-e337.

4. Finkelhor D, Ormrod H, Turner H, Hamby S. The victimization of children and youth: a comprehensive national survey. Child Maltreatment 2005; 10: 5-25.

5. Finkelhor D, Jones L, Shattuck A. Updated Trends in Child Maltreatment, 2010. Durham, NH. Crimes against Children Research Center, 2011. Available from
www.unh.edu/ccrc/pdf/CV203_Updated%20trends%202010%20FINAL_12-19-11.pdf

6. Fang X, Brown DS, Florence CS, Mercy JA. The economic burden of child maltreatment in the United States and implications for prevention. Child Abuse and Neglect 2012; 36:156-165.

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